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ISBN: 9780195597356

Published: 1 Dec 14

Availability: 640

Paperback

AU$32.95

NZ$44.99

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Furphies and Whizz-bangs

Anzac Slang from the Great War

Dr Amanda Laugesen


Furphies and Whizz-bangs: Anzac Slang from the Great War tells the story of the First World War through an examination of the slang used by Australian soldiers. Drawing on a range of primary source material taken from soldiers’ letters, diaries and trench publications, along with contemporary newspapers and books, the language of the Australian soldiers is brought to life. From the language soldiers used to make sense of military life, to the slang of the trenches, to the words of the home front, this book illuminates the cultural and social worlds of Australian soldiers. It tells us of the everyday grumblings of the soldiers, the horrors of the battlefield, and the humour they used as they tried to endure the war. Also included are chapters on the slang of the Australian Flying Corps and the Royal Australian Navy, and place names used by soldiers.
  • Use of primary source material to illuminate the world of the soldiers in their own words
  • Draws on the extensive research undertaken at the Australian National Diction­ary Centre andc.anu.edu.au


INTRODUCTION – WORDS FROM THE BIG STOUSH: TRACING THE LANGUAGE OF AUSTRALIAN SOLDIERS
1. He earned his name as digger: Australian soldiers
2. Things are well up to putty here: Life in the army
3. If the Kiwi King you’re after: Military hierarchy, bureaucracy and other sourc¬es of complaint
4. Alley at the toot: Languages
5. Fritz was napoo: Enemies and friends
6. The usual nightly strafe: Trench and battlefield
7. Passing Shrapnel Corner: Place names
8. The daily hate: Weapons and the technology of war
9. Language of the air and Sea: Words of the Australian Flying Corps and Royal Australian Navy
10.Aussieland, the diggers’ home sweet home: Home and home front
CONCLUSION – RECORDING AND REMEMBERING THE LANGUAGE OF THE SOLDIERS OF THE GREAT WAR
BIBLIOGRAPHY
WORD LIST

Dr Amanda Laugesen is a historian and Director of the Australian National Dictionary Centre, Australian National University. She is the author of several books, including the lexical monographs Convict Words: the Language of the Australian Convict Era (2002) and Diggerspeak: the Language of Australians at War (2005). Her most recent book is Boredom is the Enemy: the Intellectual and Imaginative Lives of Australian Soldiers in the Great War and Beyond (2012).