Buddhism

What Everyone Needs to Know

Dale S. Wright

Buddhism

What Everyone Needs to Know

Dale S. Wright

ISBN:

9780190843663

Binding:

Paperback

Published:

15 Feb 2020

Availability:

Print on demand

Series:

What Everyone Needs to Know

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$27.99 NZD

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Description

Buddhism is one of the oldest and largest of the world's religions. But it is also a tradition that has proven to have enormous contemporary relevance. Founded by Siddhartha Gautama, who came to be called the Buddha, the religion has spread from its origins in northeast India, across Asia, and eventually to the West, taking on new forms at each step of the way. Buddhism: What Everyone Needs to Know offers readers a brief, authoritative guide to one of the world's most diverse religious traditions in a reader-friendly question-and-answer format. Dale Wright covers the origins and early history of Buddhism, the diversity of types of Buddhism throughout history, and the status of contemporary Buddhism. This is a go-to book for anyone seeking a basic understanding of the origins, history, teachings, and practices of Buddhism.

Contents

Foreward 1. Origins and Early History 2. Buddhist Diversity 3. Buddhist Teachings 4. Buddhist Practices 5. Contemporary Global Buddhism Glossary Further Reading Index

Authors

Dale S. Wright , David B. and Mary H. Gamble Professor of Religion, Occidental College, USA

Dale S. Wright is a Professor of Religious and Asian Studies at Occidental College and has been actively engaged in the study of Buddhism for over four decades. He has travelled and lived extensively throughout Asia and has first-hand experience with many different types and nationalities of Buddhism. He is the author of numerous books, including What Is Buddhist Enlightenment? and The Six Perfections: Buddhism and the Cultivation of Character.

Reviews

"I think Buddhism: What Everyone Needs to Know takes its rightful place in bookstores for intelligent readers who would like to get an overall picture of the various Buddhist traditions." -- Peter Feldmeier, Horizons: The Journal of the College Theology Society